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Struggle With Statistics? Your 'Fixed Mindset' Might Be To Blame

Slashdot - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 18:00
A new study in Frontiers in Psychology examined why people struggle so much to solve statistical problems, particularly why we show a marked preference for complicated solutions over simpler, more intuitive ones. Chalk it up to our resistance to change. From a report: The study concluded that fixed mindsets are to blame: we tend to stick with the familiar methods we learned in school, blinding us to the existence of a simpler solution. Roughly 96 percent of the general population struggles with solving problems relating to statistics and probability. Yet being a well-informed citizen in the 21st century requires us to be able to engage competently with these kinds of tasks, even if we don't encounter them in a professional setting. "As soon as you pick up a newspaper, you're confronted with so many numbers and statistics that you need to interpret correctly," says co-author Patrick Weber, a graduate student in math education at the University of Regensburg in Germany. Most of us fall far short of the mark. Part of the problem is the counterintuitive way in which such problems are typically presented. Meadows presented his evidence in the so-called "natural frequency format" (for example, 1 in 10 people), rather than in terms of a percentage (10 percent of the population). That was a smart decision, since 1-in-10 a more intuitive, jury-friendly approach. Recent studies have shown that performance rates on many statistical tasks increased from four percent to 24 percent when the problems were presented using the natural frequency format.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Here's our first peek at Fortnite's unreleased gifting system

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 17:05

A gifting system is coming to Fortnite.

Twitterer @The1Jaren (thanks, Forbes) was able to gift themselves the Behold emote, and posted a brief video as evidence. Here, take a look:

"It's not a staging version of the game", Jaren clarified in a subsequent tweet. "It's just the normal version with the gifting system enabled."

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Categories: Video Games

Pentagon Reveals Cyber Breach of Travel Records

Slashdot - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 17:00
The Pentagon on Friday said there has been a cyber breach of Defense Department travel records that compromised the personal information and credit card data of U.S. military and civilian personnel. From a report: According to a U.S. official familiar with the matter, the breach could have affected as many as 30,000 workers, but that number may grow as the investigation continues. The breach could have happened some months ago but was only recently discovered. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the breach is under investigation, said that no classified information was compromised. According to a Pentagon statement, a department cyber team informed leaders about the breach on Oct. 4. Lt. Col. Joseph Buccino, a Pentagon spokesman, said the department is still gathering information on the size and scope of the hack and who did it. "It's important to understand that this was a breach of a single commercial vendor that provided service to a very small percentage of the total population" of Defense Department personnel, said Buccino.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

A Grand Theft Auto 5 feature documentary, The Billion Dollar Game, is in production

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 16:18

A new feature documentary called The Billion Dollar Game will explore the highs - and lows - of Rockstar Games' Grand Theft Auto 5.

Tackling the biggest selling video game in US history - which is still selling millions of copies many years after its 2013 release - the documentary aims to explore the development of the series by way of archive material and new interview footage. According to Screen Daily, filming is already underway.

UK director Rob Ryan (Breaking Habits) is signed up to direct, with producers confirmed as Salon Pictures' Annabel Wigoder and Nick Taussig.

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Categories: Video Games

In an Open Letter, Microsoft Employees Urge the Company To Not Bid on the US Military's Project JEDI

Slashdot - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 16:00
On Tuesday, Microsoft expressed its intent to bid on the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI) contract -- a contract that represents a $10 billion project to build cloud services for the Department of Defense. The contract is massive in scope and shrouded in secrecy, which makes it nearly impossible to know what technologies Microsoft would be building for the Department of Defense. At an industry day for JEDI, DoD Chief Management Officer John H. Gibson II explained the program's impact, saying, "We need to be very clear. This program is truly about increasing the lethality of our department." This has ruffled a few feathers inside the Redmond-based software giant. In an open letter published Saturday, an unspecified number of Microsoft employees stated their disapproval. They wrote: Many Microsoft employees don't believe that what we build should be used for waging war. When we decided to work at Microsoft, we were doing so in the hopes of "empowering every person on the planet to achieve more," not with the intent of ending lives and enhancing lethality. For those who say that another company will simply pick up JEDI where Microsoft leaves it, we would ask workers at that company to do the same. A race to the bottom is not an ethical position. Like those who took action at Google, Salesforce, and Amazon, we ask all employees of tech companies to ask how your work will be used, where it will be applied, and act according to your principles. We need to put JEDI in perspective. This is a secretive $10 billion project with the ambition of building "a more lethal" military force overseen by the Trump Administration. The Google workers who protested these collaborations and forced the company to take action saw this. We do too. So we ask, what are Microsoft's A.I. Principles, especially regarding the violent application of powerful A.I. technology? How will workers, who build and maintain these services in the first place, know whether our work is being used to aid profiling, surveillance, or killing? Earlier this year Microsoft published "The Future Computed," examining the applications and potential dangers of A.I. It argues that strong ethical principles are necessary for the development of A.I. that will benefit people, and defines six core principles: "fair, reliable and safe, private and secure, inclusive, transparent, and accountable." With JEDI, Microsoft executives are on track to betray these principles in exchange for short-term profits. If Microsoft is to be accountable for the products and services it makes, we need clear ethical guidelines and meaningful accountability governing how we determine which uses of our technology are acceptable, and which are off the table. Microsoft has already acknowledged the dangers of the tech it builds, even calling on the federal government to regulate A.I. technologies. But there is no law preventing the company from exercising its own internal scrutiny and standing by its own ethical compass. Further reading: Google Drops Out of Pentagon's $10 Billion Cloud Competition.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Metal Gear Solid HD back-compat for Xbox One is the best way to play

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 15:00

If there's one game franchise crying out for the full current-gen remastering treatment, it's Metal Gear Solid. The classic MGS titles have remained untouched since 2011's excellent Metal Gear Solid HD collection, with no sign of any Xbox One or PlayStation 4 re-releases - despite the emergence of MGS cutscenes apparently running on the Fox Engine on a Japan-only pachinko machine, of all places. However, there is some good news: the 2011 remaster is now backwards compatible on Xbox One, and as things stand, this is easily the best way to play these brilliant games on modern hardware.

Expectations do need to be managed, however. In common with all standard Xbox 360 titles running on Xbox One, rendering resolution remains at the same 720p with 2x MSAA as Bluepoint's original remaster, and aside from additional 16x anisotropic filtering added at the system software level on Xbox One X, the overall presentation on all of the titles in the package is identical to their Xbox 360 counterparts. However, running on backwards compatibility takes a key advantage of the remasters and improves on it still further.

Of course, I'm talking about performance, where Bluepoint Games' original work attempts to run both MGS2 and its much more challenging sequel at a locked 60fps. The task facing the developer was significantly more straightforward with MGS2 in that Kojima's team targeted 60Hz gameplay for the original PlayStation 2 release. The end result is that the transition to Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 resulted in a mostly locked frame-rate during the majority of the action. The opening tanker area with Snake is arguably the biggest stress-test you'll find in the game, with lots of geometry and rain effects. The last-gen system handle this well, and so there's no surprise that Xbox One and X both follow suit.

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Categories: Video Games

Looks like Diablo 3: Eternal Collection won't be cross-play after all

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 14:59

Blizzard has dashed hopes that Diablo 3: Eternal Collection will be available with cross-play.

Business Insider initially reported that during a demonstration, a Blizzard representative confirmed that console cross-play - which would enable Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One players to play together - was "a question of when, not if".

The news seemed plausible given Sony recently reversed its decision to prevent cross-play, permitting PlayStation 4 owners to play with people playing on Nintendo Switch and Xbox One for the first time.

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Categories: Video Games

Here are the stars of BBC's Strictly Come Dancing jumping on the Fortnite bandwagon

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 13:35

Fancy a steaming side order of cringe with your Sunday dinner? Of course you do. So here are the stars of BBC's Strictly Come Dancing trying out some of Fortnite's most iconic moves, including Groove Jam, Hype, Fresh, and Floss.

The comments to the tweet are a delicious - and predictable - blend of outrage, hilarity, plentiful emojis, and at least one inevitable Brexit hashtag. This one's probably my favourite, though:

Much to many commenters dismay, though, it seems the tweet was just a bit of fun, as apparently Fortnite was nowhere to be seen on the show itself last night.

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Categories: Video Games

Ask Slashdot: Can You Install a Wifi Mesh Network in a Barn?

Slashdot - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 13:34
Long-time Slashdot reader pikester has a friend running a museum "looking to make it more interactive for visitors." To make this happen, the museum is going to need to have good WiFi connectivity throughout the premises. The good news is that the museum is pretty small. The bad news is that it is located in an old horse barn with many metal walls. I'm hoping to put in a mesh network for him, but most solutions I've seen are pretty bulky. I'm looking for recommendations for a solution that is easily mountable in the building. Long-time Slashdot reader Spazmania suggests it's "not terribly complicated." After setting access points to same SSID but different channels (and with the transmit power down), "walk around with a piece of free software such as Wifi Analyzer and tweak the positions and transmit power on the access points until the signal levels look good in wifi analyzer." But are there other solutions? Leave your own best answers in the comments. Can you install a wifi mesh network in a barn?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

For Honor's Marching Fire expansion includes 'graphical enhancements' to lighting, weather, and textures

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 12:46

For Honor's upcoming Marching Fire expansion will include a huge graphical overhaul.

The "Graphical Enhancements Showcase" segment of a recent livestream illustrates exactly what's been improved, which includes a major update to global illumination, updated sky tech, plus new tone mapping and colour grading, too.

Ubisoft - which started the upgrading process just after the multiplayer brawler was released - has also reworked all textures in the game.

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Categories: Video Games

Latest Steam Link update lets you play local co-op by 'streaming to multiple devices simultaneously'

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 11:15

The Steam Link now supports local co-op by simultaneously streaming to multiple devices.

There's no supporting information and the update isn't particularly detailed, but according to the most recent Steam Client patch notes - which note that the patch has been updated since it was originally deployed on 11th October to include a "crash workaround" for the AMD driver on Windows - streaming to more than one device is now available providing you have a "high quality 5 GHz WiFi" network (thanks, PC Gamer).

It also confirms that Android phones can now also be used it as a touch controller, too.

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Categories: Video Games

Evasion is a VR wave shooter that adds mobility but avoids innovation

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 10:00

If you're looking for an episode of Ian's VR Corner over on our YouTube channel today you're going to be disappointed - there isn't one. Don't worry though, the series isn't over, it just went up a little earlier in the week instead!

Our regular Tuesday streaming slot collided with the launch of this week's big PSVR release, Evasion, so I thought I'd try combining the two for a special, streamed episode of Ian's VR Corner. That means there's 90 minutes of unedited and uncensored, VR visuals for you to enjoy in the video below.

If you've watched the pre-release trailers for Evasion you'll be forgiven for thinking that it was some kind of follow-up to Farpoint, Impulse Gear's sci-fi shooter that launched alongside Sony's Aim controller last year.

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Categories: Video Games

Humans Are Now Monitoring Animals With Facial Recognition Technology

Slashdot - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 09:34
An anonymous reader quotes New York magazine: Salmon are just the latest entry in a growing cornucopia of animal faces loaded into databases. For some animals, the biometric data gathered from them is being used to aid in conservation efforts. For others, the resulting AI could help ward off poachers. While partly creepy and partly very cute, monitoring of these animals can both help protect their populations and ensure safe, traceable livestock for developing communities... U.K. researchers are using online resources like Flickr and Instagram to help build and strengthen a database that will eventually help track global tiger populations in real time. Once collected, the photos are analyzed by everyday people in a free app called Wildsense... The mighty lion is being surveilled too. Conservationists and wildlife teachers are using facial recognition to keep tabs on a database of over 1,000 lions... Wildlife experts are tracking elephants to protect them from encroaching poachers. Using Google's Cloud AutoML Vision machine learning software, the technology will uniquely identify elephants in the wild. According to the Evening Standard, the tech will even send out an alert if it detects poachers in the same frame. The story of whale facial tracking is one of crowdsourcing success. After struggling to distinguish specific whales from one another on his own, marine biologist Christian Khan uploaded the photos to data-competition site Kaggle and, within four months, data-science company Deepsense was able to accurately detect individual whale faces with 87% accuracy. Since then, detection rates have steadily improved and are helping conservationists track and monitor the struggling aquatic giant. U.S. researchers are trying to protect "the world's most endangered animal" with LemurFaceID, which is able to accurately differentiate between two lemur faces with 97% accuracy. But "In the livestock surveillance arms race China is definitely leading the charge," the article notes, citing e-commerce giant JD.com and its use of facial recognition to monitor herds of pigs to detect their age, weight, and diet. And one Chinese company even offers a blockchain-based chicken tracking system (codenamed "GoGo Chicken") with an app that can link a grocery store chicken to "its birthplace, what food it ate and how many steps it walked during its life."

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Meet the F1 racer who streams PUBG, and the esports racer who's now part of an F1 team

Eurogamer - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 09:00

Every year, some of the best drivers in the world - champions from F1, the WEC, NASCAR and the WRC amongst other disciplines - get together to work towards the answer of that perennial motorsport fan's pint-fuelled topic: what if you could put every driver in identical machinery? What if you could strip away the technical side of the sport and find out, once and for all, who's the fastest driver of them all?

The Race of Champions is a fairly informal get-together, with a bit of an end-of-term feel to it, but you can't dull a racing driver's competitive edge, and this year's running was no different. Here, reigning Indycar champion Josef Newgarden was competing alongside DTM and sportscar maestro Rene Rast, Le Mans legend Tom Kristensen and such towering former-F1 veterans as David Coulthard and Juan Pablo Montoya. Not a bad field, all in all.

But perhaps the most impressive performance was put in by a relative newcomer - and by someone who, just months before, was still working as kitchen sales manager back in the small city of Lelystad. Rudy van Buren's tale is one that's told countless times in motorsport; a karting champion in his youth, at 16 the money dried up, and with it his dreams of making it in the sport. But then comes a pleasant twist; at 25-years-old, having found rFactor 2 and applied his skills to a different type of racing, he emerged victorious in McLaren's The World's Fastest Gamer competition. The prize? No less than employment as the team's simulator driver - as well as a few other bonuses along the way.

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Categories: Video Games

Slashdot Asks: Can Anything Replace 'QWERTY' Keyboards?

Slashdot - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 05:19
MIT Technology Review recently discussed new attempts to replace the standard 'QWERY' keyboard layout, including Tap, "a one-handed gadget that fits over your fingers like rubbery brass knuckles and connects wirelessly to your smartphone." It's supposed to free you from clunky physical keyboards and act as a go-anywhere typing interface. A promotional video shows smiling people wearing Tap and typing with one hand on a leg, on an arm, and even (perhaps jokingly) on some guy's forehead... But when I tried it, the reality of using Tap was neither fun nor funny. Unlike a conventional QWERTY keyboard, Tap required me to think a lot, because I had to tap my fingers in not-very-intuitive combinations to create letters: an A is your thumb, a B is your index finger and pinky, a C is all your fingers except the index. The article also acknowledges the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout and other alternatives like the one-handed Twiddler keyboard, but argues that "neither managed to dent QWERTY's dominance." [W]hat if the future is no input interface at all? Neurable is a startup in Cambridge, Massachusetts, that's working on a way to type simply by thinking. It uses an electrode-dotted headband connected to a VR headset to track brain activity. Machine learning helps figure out what letter you're trying to select and anticipate which key you'll want next. After you select several keys, it can fill in the rest of the word, says cofounder and CEO Ramses Alcaide.... Then there's the device being built over at CTRL-Labs: an armband that detects the activity of muscle fibers in the arm. One use could be to replace gaming controllers. For another feature in the works, algorithms use the data to figure out what it is that your hands are trying to type, even if they're barely moving. CEO and cofounder Thomas Reardon, who previously created Microsoft's Internet Explorer, says this too is a neural interface, of a sort. Whether you're typing or dictating, you're using your brain to turn muscles on and off, he points out. While a developer version will be shipped this year, Reardon "admits that it is still not good enough for him to toss his trusty mid-'80s IBM Model M keyboard, which he says still 'sounds like rolling thunder' when he types." But do any Slashdot readers have their own suggestions or experiences to share? Can anything replace 'QWERTY' keyboards?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Climate Change Report Actually Understates Threats

Slashdot - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 03:13
"Dire as it is, the latest IPCC report is actually too optimistic," writes Slashdot reader Dan Drollette. "It ignores the risk of self-reinforcing climate feedbacks pushing the planet into chaos beyond human control. So says a team of climate experts, including the winner of the 1995 Nobel for his work on depletion of the ozone layer." From their article: These cascading feedbacks include the loss of the Arctic's sea ice, which could disappear entirely in summer in the next 15 years. The ice serves as a shield, reflecting heat back into the atmosphere, but is increasingly being melted into water that absorbs heat instead. Losing the ice would tremendously increase the Arctic's warming, which is already at least twice the global average rate. This, in turn, would accelerate the collapse of permafrost, releasing its ancient stores of methane, a super climate pollutant 30 times more potent in causing warming than carbon dioxide. By largely ignoring such feedbacks, the IPCC report fails to adequately warn leaders about the cluster of six similar climate tipping points that could be crossed between today's temperature and an increase to 1.5 degrees -- let alone nearly another dozen tipping points between 1.5 and 2 degrees. These wildcards could very likely push the climate system beyond human ability to control. As the UN Secretary General reminded world leaders last month, "We face an existential threat. Climate change is moving faster than we are.⦠If we do not change course by 2020, we risk missing the point where we can avoid runaway climate change, with disastrous consequences." In related news, a court in The Hague "has upheld a historic legal order on the Dutch government to accelerate carbon emissions cuts, a day after the world's climate scientists warned that time was running out to avoid dangerous warming. Appeal court judges ruled that the severity and scope of the climate crisis demanded greenhouse gas reductions of at least 25% by 2020 -- measured against 1990 levels -- higher than the 17% drop planned by Mark Rutte's liberal administration. The ruling -- which was greeted with whoops and cheers in the courtroom -- will put wind in the sails of a raft of similar cases being planned around the world, from Norway to New Zealand and from the UK to Uganda." Meanwhile, a new article in GQ cites estimates that more than 70 percent of global emissions come from just 100 companies, complaining that "there is no 'free market' incentive to prevent disaster."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Are Universal Basic Incomes 'A Tool For Our Further Enslavement'?

Slashdot - Sun, 14/10/2018 - 00:37
Douglas Rushkoff, long-time open source advocate (and currently a professor of Digital Economics at the City University of New York, Queens College), is calling Universal Basic Incomes "no gift to the masses, but a tool for our further enslavement." Uber's business plan, like that of so many other digital unicorns, is based on extracting all the value from the markets it enters. This ultimately means squeezing employees, customers, and suppliers alike in the name of continued growth. When people eventually become too poor to continue working as drivers or paying for rides, UBI supplies the required cash infusion for the business to keep operating. When it's looked at the way a software developer would, it's clear that UBI is really little more than a patch to a program that's fundamentally flawed. The real purpose of digital capitalism is to extract value from the economy and deliver it to those at the top. If consumers find a way to retain some of that value for themselves, the thinking goes, you're doing something wrong or "leaving money on the table." Walmart perfected the softer version of this model in the 20th century. Move into a town, undercut the local merchants by selling items below cost, and put everyone else out of business. Then, as sole retailer and sole employer, set the prices and wages you want. So what if your workers have to go on welfare and food stamps. Now, digital companies are accomplishing the same thing, only faster and more completely.... Soon, consumers simply can't consume enough to keep the revenues flowing in. Even the prospect of stockpiling everyone's data, like Facebook or Google do, begins to lose its allure if none of the people behind the data have any money to spend. To the rescue comes UBI. The policy was once thought of as a way of taking extreme poverty off the table. In this new incarnation, however, it merely serves as a way to keep the wealthiest people (and their loyal vassals, the software developers) entrenched at the very top of the economic operating system. Because of course, the cash doled out to citizens by the government will inevitably flow to them.... Under the guise of compassion, UBI really just turns us from stakeholders or even citizens to mere consumers. Once the ability to create or exchange value is stripped from us, all we can do with every consumptive act is deliver more power to people who can finally, without any exaggeration, be called our corporate overlords... if Silicon Valley's UBI fans really wanted to repair the economic operating system, they should be looking not to universal basic income but universal basic assets, first proposed by Institute for the Future's Marina Gorbis... As appealing as it may sound, UBI is nothing more than a way for corporations to increase their power over us, all under the pretense of putting us on the payroll. It's the candy that a creep offers a kid to get into the car or the raise a sleazy employer gives a staff member who they've sexually harassed. It's hush money. Rushkoff's conclusion? "Whether its proponents are cynical or simply naive, UBI is not the patch we need."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Facebook Says Russian Firms 'Scraped' Data, Some for Facial Recognition

Slashdot - Sat, 13/10/2018 - 23:34
An anonymous reader quotes the New York Times: On the same day Facebook announced that it had carried out its biggest purge yet of American accounts peddling disinformation, the company quietly made another revelation: It had removed 66 accounts, pages and apps linked to Russian firms that build facial recognition software for the Russian government. Facebook said Thursday that it had removed any accounts associated with SocialDataHub and its sister firm, Fubutech, because the companies violated its policies by scraping data from the social network. "Facebook has reason to believe your work for the government has included matching photos from individuals' personal social media accounts in order to identify them," the company said in a cease-and-desist letter to SocialDataHub that was dated Tuesday and viewed by The New York Times... As Facebook is taking a closer look at its own products amid increasing scrutiny and public outcry, it is increasingly finding examples of companies that have been exploiting its global social network for questionable ends.... Artur Khachuyan, the 26-year-old chief executive of SocialDataHub and Fubutech, said in an interview Friday that Fubutech scraped data from the web, particularly Google search and the Russian search engine Yandex, to build a database of Russian citizens and their images that the government can use for facial recognition. "We don't know exactly what they do with it," he said.... At one point in a 30-minute phone interview, he said the Russian Defense Ministry was a client but later said he could not name Fubutech's government clients. The two Russian companies have been around for over four years, "relying in part on Facebook data," the Times reports. "At the top of the SocialDataHub's website, there is a single line: 'We know everything about everybody.'"

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Why Someone Put a Giant, Inflatable Bitcoin Rat on Wall Street

Slashdot - Sat, 13/10/2018 - 22:34
There's now a giant, inflatable rat covered in crypto code across from the Federal Reserve. An anonymous reader quotes Fortune: The bitcoin rat, first noted on Reddit, was created by Nelson Saiers, an artist and former hedge fund manager, according to Coindesk. The art installation, which appeared earlier this week and is temporary, is intended as much as a tribute to bitcoin's creator Satoshi Nakamoto as much as it is a condemnation of the Fed and critics of cryptocurrencies. "The sculpture's supposed to kind of reflect the spirit of Satoshi and what he's trying to do," Saiers told Coindesk, who noted the rat image was inspired in part by another titan of traditional finance. "Warren Buffett called bitcoin 'rat poison squared' but if the Fed's a rat, then maybe rat poison is a good thing," he said... "This is a very iconic image for protest," Saiers told blockchain news site Breaker. "Somewhere in the heart of bitcoin is a bit of protest of big bank bailouts." That idea appeared to be lost on some Redditors, who claimed they spotted the bitcoin rat in the wilds of Wall Street but didn't immediately see its significance. "I walked past it today," one wrote. "Had no idea it was about Bitcoin." "It's cool, but people walking by won't understand it," said another. "I don't even understand it. Needs a BTC logo or something."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

America Finally Abandons Plan To Convert Plutonium Bombs Into Nuclear Fuel

Slashdot - Sat, 13/10/2018 - 21:34
MOX hoped to convert plutonium from Cold War bombs into fuel for nuclear power plants, but even though the project was about 70% complete, Washington has pulled the plug. Slashdot reader Mr. Dollar Ton shared this story from Reuters: The Department of Energy told Senate and House of Representatives committees in May that MOX, a type of specialized nuclear recycling plant that has never been built in the United States, would cost about $48 billion more than the $7.6 billion already spent on it. Instead of completing MOX, the Trump administration, like the Obama administration before it, wants to blend the 34 tonnes of deadly plutonium -- enough to make about 8,000 nuclear weapons -- with an inert substance and bury it underground in New Mexico's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Burying the plutonium would cost nearly $20 billion over the next two decades and would require 400 jobs at Savannah River, the Department of Energy has estimated.

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