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Consumer Reports: Latest Autopilot 'Far Less Competent Than a Human'

Slashdot - Thu, 23/05/2019 - 01:50
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: In recent weeks, Tesla has been pushing out a new version of Autopilot with automatic lane-change capabilities to Model 3s -- including one owned by Consumer Reports. So the group dispatched several drivers to highways around the group's car-testing center in Connecticut to test the feature. The results weren't good. The "latest version of Tesla's automatic lane-changing feature is far less competent than a human driver," Consumer Reports declares. CR found that the Model 3's rear cameras didn't seem able to see very far behind the vehicle. Autopilot has forward-facing radar to help detect vehicles ahead of the car and measure their speed, but it lacks rear-facing radar that would give the car advance warning of vehicles approaching quickly from the rear. The result: CR found that the Model 3 tended to cut off cars that were approaching rapidly from behind. The vehicle also violated some Connecticut driving laws, the testers found. "Several CR testers observed Navigate on Autopilot initiate a pass on the right on a two-lane divided highway," writes CR's Keith Barry. "We checked with a law enforcement official who confirmed this is considered an 'improper pass' in Connecticut and could result in a ticket." The vehicle also failed to move back over to the right lane after completing a pass as required by state law, CR reports. Ultimately, driving with Autopilot's automatic lane-changing feature is "much harder than just changing lanes yourself," writes CR's Jake Fisher said. "Using the system is like monitoring a kid behind the wheel for the very first time. As any parent knows, it's far more convenient and less stressful to simply drive yourself."

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Millions of Golfers Land In Privacy Hazard After Cloud Misconfig

Slashdot - Thu, 23/05/2019 - 01:10
Millions of golfer records from the Game Golf app, including GPS details from courses played, usernames and passwords, and even Facebook login data, were all exposed for anyone with an internet browser to see -- a veritable hole-in-one for a cyberattacker looking to build profiles for potential victims, to be used in follow-on social-engineering attacks. Threatpost reports: Security Discovery researcher Bob Diachenko recently ran across an Elastic database that was not password-protected and thus visible in any browser. Further inspection showed that it belongs to Game Golf, which is a family of apps developed by San Francisco-based Game Your Game Inc. Game Golf comes as a free app, as a paid pro version with coaching tools and also bundled with a wearable. It's a straightforward analyzer for those that like to hit the links -- tracking courses played, GPS data for specific shots, various player stats and so on -- plus there's a messaging and community function, and an optional "caddy" feature. It's popular, too: It has 50,000+ installs on Google Play. Unfortunately, Game Golf landed its users in a sand trap of privacy concerns by not securing the database: Security Discovery senior security researcher Jeremiah Fowler said that the bucket included all of the aforementioned analyzer information, plus profile data like usernames and hashed passwords, emails, gender, and Facebook IDs and authorization tokens. In all, the exposure consisted of millions of records, including details on "134 million rounds of golf, 4.9 million user notifications and 19.2 million records in a folder called 'activity feed,'" Fowler said. The database also contained network information for the company: IP addresses, ports, pathways and storage info that "cybercriminals could exploit to access deeper into the network," according to Fowler, writing in a post on Tuesday. No word on whether malicious players took a swing at the data, as it were, but the sheer breadth of the information that the app gathers is concerning, Fowler noted.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Playdate is a quirky new handheld with some great indie designers onboard - and it has a crank!

Eurogamer - Thu, 23/05/2019 - 00:56

Developer Panic (which also handled publishing duties for Firewatch and the upcoming Untitled Goose Game) has unveiled Playdate, an adorable, quirky, and undoubtedly niche, new handheld console designed specifically for unique indie titles. And it has a crank!

Starting with the hardware, Playdate is immediately (if not, perhaps, universally) appealing, sporting a playful yellow sheen and lots of friendly curves. It features a d-pad, two buttons, and a 2.7-inch black and white (but high-resolution) screen. It also manages to pack in wi-fi, Bluetooth, USB-C, a rechargeable battery, a headphone jack, and, yes, that crank - which we'll get to momentarily. The whole thing, incidentally, is tiny, measuring 74x76x9mm.

"Playdate isn't trying to compete with the other devices that we already play and love," Panic explained, "It's designed to be complementary. It's designed to deliver a jolt of fun in-between the times you spend with your phone and your home console; something to fill the moments when you just want a game you can pick-up and play."

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Categories: Video Games

Crowdfunded Android Console Ouya Will Be Shut Down On June 25th

Slashdot - Thu, 23/05/2019 - 00:30
Razer, the gaming hardware manufacturing company that purchased Ouya's software assets in mid-2015, announced today that the crowdfunded Android console will cease functioning on June 25th. "That date will mark the unremarkable end of what began as a runaway Kickstarter success story: the inexpensive Ouya mini-console was powered by Android and introduced games such as TowerFall," reports The Verge. "But despite being positioned as the indie console, Ouya never quite took off after its $8.5 million crowdfunding campaign. The goal was to move Android's indie gaming scene to TV screens -- with exclusive Ouya-only titles mixed in -- but the execution didn't pan out." From the report: The hardware has been discontinued ever since Razer acquired Ouya's software assets in 2015. So it's somewhat surprising that the platform has continued to plod along for nearly four additional years. But that all ends next month. Accounts will be deactivated on June 25th. After that, Razer says "access to the Discover section will no longer be available. Games downloaded that appear in Play may still function if they do not require a purchase validation upon launch." But by and large, games on the Ouya platform will stop working after the cutoff date. Razer notes that some developers might choose to help their Ouya customers by activating the same game on some other platform (i.e., Google Play) where available following the shutdown. Razer's own Forge TV device will continue functioning as an Android TV set-top box, but the Forge TV games store is also going offline come the 25th. Part of Razer's thinking behind the Ouya acquisition was to propel its long-term Android TV gaming ambitions. The company has clearly shifted its priorities over the last few years, as indicated by the decision to finally shut down Ouya once and for all.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Reddit Co-Founder Alexis Ohanian Speaks Out Against 'Always-On' Work Culture

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 23:50
At The Wall Street Journal's Future of Everything Festival on Tuesday, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian spoke out against the toxicity of "hustle porn" and how always-on work culture creates "broken" people. An anonymous reader shares an excerpt from the report: I've spoken out quite a bit about things like 'hustle porn,' and this ceremony of showing off on social [media] about how hard you're working," said Mr. Ohanian, who previously co-founded online discussion forum Reddit. "Y'all see it on Instagram and you certainly see it in the startup community, and it becomes really toxic." Business men in his position are rarely asked about juggling the requirements of their roles outside of work, like in their family, he said, and that contributes to unrealistic expectations that a job can reflect the entirety of anyone's identity as a human being. "All of us who decide to start a company, we're kind of broken as people," because founders are often singularly-focused on the success of their venture, said Mr. Ohanian. Even with great mentors and investors supporting their vision, entrepreneurs tend to put a great deal of pressure on themselves to work harder than anyone else to achieve success and profitability. That psychological pressure is compounded by what he and others refer to as "hustle culture." "You have this culture of posturing, and this culture that glorifies the most absurd things and ignores things like self-care, and ignores things like therapy, and ignores things like actually taking care of yourself as a physical being for the sake of work at all costs. It's a toxic problem," said Mr. Ohanian. This issue isn't limited to technology companies, he added, noting that his acquaintances in finance and other industries also promote an unhealthy attitude that encourages 12-hour work days and few breaks. "Social media has made it possible to weaponize it to the point where, if [bragging about your difficult workweek] gets hearts, you're incentivized to keep pushing" the limits.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Hackers Are Holding Baltimore's Government Computers Hostage

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 23:10
On May 7, hackers infected about 10,000 of Baltimore city government's computers with an aggressive form of ransomware called RobbinHood, and insisted the city pay 13 bitcoin (then $76,280, today $102,310) to cut the computers loose. The hackers claimed the price would go up every day after four days, and after the tenth day, the affected files would be lost forever. From a report: "We won't talk more, all we know is MONEY!" the ransom note read. "Hurry up! Tik Tak, Tik Tak, Tik Tak!" But the city has not paid. In the two weeks since, Baltimore citizens have not had access to many city services. The city payment services and email systems are still offline. A May 7 Baltimore Sun report stated the Robbinhood ransomware used in this attack encrypts files with a "file-locking" virus so the hackers can hold the files hostage. Among the departments that have had issues with their email and phone systems are the Department of Public Works, the Department of Transportation, and the Baltimore Police Department. According to the Wall Street Journal, Baltimore Health Department's epidemiologists aren't able to use the network that allows them to alert citizens of certain which types of drugs are causing recent overdoses. Many services have resumed through phone, and vital emergency systems like 911 and 311 reportedly continued to function. The ransomware froze the system the city uses for executing home sales, which reportedly hurt the local market, but the city began implementing a manual workaround earlier this week.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Redout dogfighter spin-off Space Assault has been delayed indefinitely

Eurogamer - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 22:44

34BigThings, the studio behind 2016's excellent anti-grav racer Redout, has announced that its upcoming dogfighter spin-off Space Assault has been delayed out of its previously anticipated Q1 2019 release window.

Redout: Space Assault was first revealed during E3 2018, and a promising gameplay trailer emerged toward the end of last year. The intergalactic shooter was clearly a very different beast to its predecessor, but 34BigThings promised that the two shared the same "adrenaline rush, high skill ceiling, frantic pace and popping aesthetics".

At the time, the developer said it was aiming to release Space Assault during Q1 2019, a window that it obviously missed. However, 34BigThings has now broken its silence in a new blog post, officially delaying the game, and even going as far as to say that it's unsure "when [it] will come out, and whether it will come out this year or not."

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Categories: Video Games

How the World's First Digital Circuit Breaker Could Completely Change Our Powered World

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 22:30
This week the world's first and only digital circuit breaker was certified for commercial use. The technology, invented by Atom Power, has been listed by Underwriters Laboratories (UL), the global standard for consumer safety. This new breaker makes power easier to manage and 3000 times faster than the fastest mechanical breaker, marking the most radical advancement in power distribution since Thomas Edison. From a report: Picture the fuse box in your basement, each switch assigned to different electrical components of your home. These switches are designed to break a circuit during an electrical overload to protect your lights and appliances. When this happens, you plod down to your mechanical room and flick the switches on again. Now multiply that simple system in your home to city high rises and industrial buildings, which might have 250 circuit breakers on any given floor, each one ranging from 15 to 4000 amps at higher voltages. At this scale, the limitations and dangers of a manually controlled power system become much more evident -- and costly. Ryan Kennedy, CEO of Atom Power, has been working to build a better electrical system since he began his career 25 years ago, first as an electrician and then as an engineer and project manager on large, high profile commercial electrical projects. His experienced based inquiry has revolved around a central assertion that analog infrastructure doesn't allow us to control our power the way we should be able to. That idea has led to some pretty critical questions: "What would it take to make power systems controllable?" and "Why shouldn't that control be built in to the circuit breaker itself?"

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Google's Ad System Under EU Probe For How It Spreads Your Private Data

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 22:00
Ireland's data protection watchdog has launched an investigation into Google's collection of personal data for the purpose of online advertising. From a report: "A statutory inquiry pursuant to section 110 of the Data Protection Act 2018 has been commenced in respect of Google Ireland Limited's processing of personal data in the context of its online Ad Exchange," the Data Protection Commission said in a statement Wednesday. The DPC, one of the lead authorities over Google in the European Union, wants to know whether the search giant's "processing of personal data carried out at each stage of an advertising transaction" is in compliance with the EU's General Data Protection Regulation. The GDPR is a sweeping law that gives residents of the European Union more control over their personal data and seeks to clarify rules for online services. The DPC inquiry follows a complaint filed in Europe in September by privacy-focused browser maker Brave that says Google violates GDPR by broadcasting personal information to companies bidding to show targeted ads. At the time, Google denied any wrongdoing. On Wednesday, Johnny Ryan, Brave's chief policy and industry relations officer, said the DPC inquiry signals a change is coming that goes beyond just Google. "We need to reform online advertising to protect privacy, and to protect advertisers and publishers from legal risk under the GDPR," Ryan said in a blog post.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

GOG's new client aims to integrate all your games and friends across PC and consoles

Eurogamer - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 21:52

PC storefront GOG is in the throes of updating its Galaxy client to version 2.0, and its ambitious aim is to integrate all game libraries and friend lists across PC and consoles into one pleasingly convenient place.

GOG Galaxy in its current form offers a smartly featured, and optional, Steam-like client for buying, browsing, and launching GOG games. However, its upcoming 2.0 release is designed to create what GOG calls "the all-in-one solution for the present-day gamer".

It's intended to enable you to import all your game libraries from PC and consoles so that you can organise them into a single master collection. You'll obviously only be able launch your PC games via the client, but GOG says it intends to have integration with all major platforms. There's no confirmed list of what those might be, but it seems reasonable to assume the likes of Steam, Origin, and the Epic Store. Additionally, you'll have access to all your achievements, hours played, and games owned across all platforms, on both PC and consoles.

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Categories: Video Games

Red Dead Redemption 2 patch 1.09 tested: has HDR been fixed?

Eurogamer - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 21:21

Red Dead Redemption patch 1.09 arrived last week, delivering a huge update that took the online component out of its beta period and addressed the game's somewhat disappointing HDR support. On top of this, the patch notes discuss improving ambient occlusion, giving weight to stories circulating for months that the effect was somehow downgraded after the game launched. Were there actually reductions in visual quality? Is HDR now 'fixed'? We took a look at the new update and the news is positive: Red Dead Redemption 2 has never looked better with the new patch installed.

First impressions from an HDR perspective are impressive. The calibration screen now offers two modes - cinematic and game mode - plus there are user-controlled calibration variables for peak brightness and paper white. Side by side, the cinematic mode looks highly desaturated next to the game mode - which is perhaps not surprising as cinematic is effectively identical to Red Dead 2's original HDR implementation. This still presents like an eight-bit SDR image mapped into 10-bit HDR space, and for many users with HDR screens, the standard SDR mode may present a more impressive, vibrant picture.

It's in the game mode where Red Dead 2 delivers the HDR upgrade we've been waiting for. Contrast is exceptionally impressive, the bright sun's interactions with the atmospheric rendering look sublime, while highlights pop beautifully, especially on specular sheen. Moving into interiors and contrasting the darker corners with the bright light flooding into the windows gives us immense contrast, and the impression overall is that this is almost exactly the kind of HDR presentation we wanted at day one. The naming of the cinematic and game modes is interesting though, hinting at how the artists view RDR2's two HDR implementations.

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Categories: Video Games

Android and iOS Devices Impacted By New Sensor Calibration Attack

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 20:52
A new device fingerprinting technique can track Android and iOS devices across the Internet by using factory-set sensor calibration details that any app or website can obtain without special permissions. From a report: This new technique -- called a calibration fingerprinting attack, or SensorID -- works by using calibration details from gyroscope and magnetometer sensors on iOS; and calibration details from accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer sensors on Android devices. According to a team of academics from the University of Cambridge in the UK, SensorID impacts iOS devices more than Android smartphones. The reason is that Apple likes to calibrate iPhone and iPad sensors on its factory line, a process that only a few Android vendors are using to improve the accuracy of their smartphones' sensors. "Our approach works by carefully analysing the data from sensors which are accessible without any special permissions to both websites and apps," the research team said in a research paper published yesterday. "Our analysis infers the per-device factory calibration data which manufacturers embed into the firmware of the smartphone to compensate for systematic manufacturing errors [in their devices' sensors]," researchers said. This calibration data can then be used as a fingerprint, producing a unique identifier that advertising or analytics firms can use to track a user as they navigate across the internet.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

EE To Switch on UK's First 5G Network on May 30

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 20:50
UK mobile carrier EE announced its plans to launch 5G in the UK on Wednesday. The network will be switched on on May 30, with the first 5G phones available to preorder from today. From a report: EE's initial 5G rollout will focus on six cities (London, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Belfast, Birmingham and Manchester), with promises to expand to 19 cities by the end of the year. EE CEO Marc Allera promised EE 5G customers would experience average download speeds of 156 Mbps. It will be "like having a lane of the motorway all to yourself," he said, speaking at an event in London. The first devices EE will offer on its 5G plans include the OnePlus 7 Pro, the Samsung Galaxy S10, the Oppo Reno 5G, the LG V50 ThinQ, a 5G home router and an HTC Wi-Fi device. Plans start from $68 per month (for 10GB of data) and extend up to $94 per month (for 120GB of data). Earlier this month, EE announced it would offer the Huawei Mate 20 X as one of the first 5G phones it offered to customers, but due to the developments earlier this week calling into question the future of Android on Huawei phones, the network has pulled them from its initial 5G device lineup. "We've put the Huawei devices on pause until we've got a bit more information on that," said Allera.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Shareholder Efforts To Curb Amazon Facial Recognition Tech Fall Short

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 20:30
Two Amazon shareholder proposals about the company's controversial facial recognition technology failed to pass Wednesday, following a concerted push by civil rights groups and activist investors. From a report: One proposal would have banned Amazon from selling its Rekognition technology to government agencies unless it first determines the software doesn't infringe on civil liberties. The other proposal called for an independent study of the potential privacy and human rights violations caused by Rekognition. Both proposals were presented at Amazon's annual shareholder meeting in Seattle on Wednesday. The company said it isn't disclosing the vote tallies until this Friday. "The fact that there needed to be a vote on this is an embarrassment for Amazon's leadership team. It demonstrates shareholders do not have confidence that company executives are properly understanding or addressing the civil and human rights impacts of its role in facilitating pervasive government surveillance," Shankar Narayan, the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington's Technology and Liberty Project director, said in a statement. "While we have yet to see the exact breakdown of the vote, this shareholder intervention should serve as a wake-up call for the company to reckon with the real harms of face surveillance and to change course." Both proposals, which were non-binding, were long shots to pass, since Amazon's board said it was against the proposals. Major shareholders typically follow such positions to show support for the board. Also, CEO Jeff Bezos, Amazon's board chairman, is the company's biggest shareholder, controlling about 16% of its stock, and wasn't expected to vote for either proposal.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Outer Wilds, Void Bastards, Superhot coming to Xbox Game Pass in next few weeks

Eurogamer - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 19:08

Xbox Game Pass is set for another strong couple of weeks, with a fine batch of titles now revealed to be heading to the subscription service from now into June - including Superhot and Mobius Digital's intriguing Outer Wilds.

Ticking them off in sequential order, let's begin with tomorrow, 23rd May. First up is the opening instalment of developer Stoic Studio's superb, Norse-myth-inspired blend of turn-based battling and choose-your-own adventuring, The Banner Saga. That's joined by Konami's recent, Kojima-less horror survival spin-off Metal Gear Survive.

Stoic's critically lauded offering is well worth a punt for those that love a good yarn (and the second instalment comes to Xbox Game Pass on 6th June). Metal Gear Survive, meanwhile, is, perhaps unexpectedly, an enjoyable outing too.

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Categories: Video Games

Facial Recognition is Making Its Way To Cruise Ships

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 18:47
On May 14, San Francisco became the first US city to ban police and government agencies from using facial recognition. On May 22, Amazon shareholders will vote on whether to restrict the company's sale of its own facial recognition software. But at cruise operator Royal Caribbean, facial recognition still has plenty of potential. From a report: Like some airlines, Royal Caribbean has started to roll out facial recognition and other technologies to streamline its boarding process. The company's SVP of digital, Jay Schneider, tells Quartz that the typical wait time to board is 10 minutes with a mobile boarding pass; less if the passenger opts into facial recognition by uploading a "security selfie." Before those additions, he says the typical wait time was around 90 minutes. "We wanted it to be a welcoming experience, such that the agent knows who you are when you're getting there," Schneider says, adding that the company wants to turn facial recognition "not into a stop and frisk moment, but into a way to welcome you on vacation, answer any questions, and let me just get you on your way." As people churn through the line faster with mobile boarding passes and facial recognition, the rest of the line benefits as well -- that 90-minute wait will average more like 20 minutes for even those passengers boarding the old-fashioned way. Schneider says Royal Caribbean deletes security selfies at the end of each trip, to avoid storing data any longer than necessary. Royal Caribbean has also rolled out mobile boarding to board its crew members; Schneider says the technology saves the company 50,000 crew hours each year.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Indonesia Restricts WhatsApp, Facebook and Instagram Usage Following Deadly Riots

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 18:08
Indonesia is the latest nation to hit the hammer on social media after the government restricted the use of WhatsApp and Instagram following deadly riots yesterday. From a report: Numerous Indonesia-based users are today reporting difficulties sending multimedia messages via WhatsApp, which is one of the country's most popular chat apps, and posting content to Facebook, while the hashtag #instagramdown is trending among the country's Twitter users due to problems accessing the Facebook-owned photo app. Wiranto, a coordinating minister for political, legal and security affairs, confirmed in a press conference that the government is limiting access to social media and "deactivating certain features" to maintain calm, according to a report from Coconuts. Rudiantara, the communications minister of Indonesia and a critic of Facebook, explained that users "will experience lag on Whatsapp if you upload videos and photos." Facebook -- which operates both WhatsApp and Instagram -- didn't explicitly confirm the blockages , but said it has been in communication with the Indonesian government.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

EPA Plans To Get Thousands of Pollution Deaths Off the Books by Changing Its Math

Slashdot - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 17:30
The Environmental Protection Agency plans to change the way it calculates the health risks of air pollution, a shift that would make it easier to roll back a key climate change rule because it would result in far fewer predicted deaths from pollution, New York Times reported this week, citing five people with knowledge of the agency's plans. From the report: The E.P.A. had originally forecast that eliminating the Obama-era rule, the Clean Power Plan, and replacing it with a new measure would have resulted in an additional 1,400 premature deaths per year. The new analytical model would significantly reduce that number and would most likely be used by the Trump administration to defend further rollbacks of air pollution rules if it is formally adopted. The proposed shift is the latest example of the Trump administration downgrading the estimates of environmental harm from pollution in regulations. In this case, the proposed methodology would assume there is little or no health benefit to making the air any cleaner than what the law requires. Many experts said that approach was not scientifically sound and that, in the real world, there are no safe levels of the fine particulate pollution associated with the burning of fossil fuels.

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Watch Ian try out a slice of Everybody's Golf VR

Eurogamer - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 17:14

Someone famous once said that golf is a good walk spoiled, so it's probably a good job then that Everybody's Golf VR is a completely stationary experience. By cutting out all those boring strolls it means the game and its player can concentrate on pure, unadulterated virtual golfing across three gorgeous, 18 hole courses.

In the video below, you can watch me whack my way around 6 random holes as I try to work out whether or not Everybody's Golf VR is a duff or a hole-in-one. Although, please bear in mind that I knew absolutely nothing about real-life golfing before recording this video so what follows is very much a 'noobs-eye view' of the game.

As you can see, I took to the game like a Duck Hook to water and that's mainly due to how intuitive the in-game user interface is. Being able to your practice shots before taking them and having a host of meters and indicators to help you judge the power and angle of each shot makes everything super simple to pick up. Even if, like me, you've got no idea what each club is called and what they're fore.

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Categories: Video Games

Treyarch makes Call of Duty Black Ops 4's Black Ops Pass a bit better - but only for a week

Eurogamer - Wed, 22/05/2019 - 17:12

Call of Duty Black Ops 4's Black Ops Pass has come in for a lot of stick ever since it was announced. Not only does it split the userbase by containing premium maps at a time when most shooters have ditched such a strategy, but most who've forked out the £40 it costs reckon it hasn't offered value for money.

Fast forward to 21st May, and Black Ops developer Treyarch announced a new update for the game - and a part of the update is designed to make the Black Ops Pass better.

Now, those who own the Black Ops Pass grant access to all the Black Ops Pass multiplayer maps to their squadmates while playing in a party. This is welcome for those who don't own the Black Ops Pass, of course, but it's also good for those who do and want to access the maps while playing with friends who don't.

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Categories: Video Games
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