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How does Call of Duty: WW2 look on Xbox One X and PS4 Pro?

Eurogamer - Sun, 12/11/2017 - 15:00

Every year, a new Call of Duty arrives, the franchise standard bearer for 60 frames per second gameplay and by extension, the end product of some of the industry's most talented engineers, miraculously working more effects and features into a minuscule 16.7ms per frame time slice. Based on what we've seen so far, WW2 can stand proud alongside the technological miracle that was last year's Infinite Warfare. Small issues aside, this is another beautiful-looking title, pushing the series on once again without unduly compromising the 60fps lock.

To be clear though, this is just a first look at WW2, with an emphasis on the premium console platforms - PS4 Pro and Xbox One. And our focus is limited to the campaign, the area of Call of Duty titles where the linear nature of the experience typically allows the developers to carefully budget resources, pushing the sliders up as far as they can comfortably go. It's in this area of the game where COD typically delivers the most bang for your buck, but it's a world apart from the more freeform multiplayer.

Regardless, it's fascinating to see the aesthetic of the game and the core enhancements in technology reflect the series' aim to get back to a more realistic setting. The lighting in WW2 is a massive revamp from what we've seen from the series before, the COD engine (or at least Sledgehammer Games' fork of it) offering up a beautiful, full HDR presentation for the first time. The realism extends to materials too, which fit seamlessly into the scene in all areas. There's also a renewed emphasis on character rendering: WW2 features beautifully realised characters, with remarkably well-realised skin shaders and excellent animation.

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Categories: Video Games

Ask Slashdot: Can You Convert Old iPods Into A Home Music-Streaming Solution?

Slashdot - Sun, 12/11/2017 - 13:46
Slashdot reader zhennian wants to stream music throughout his entire house, "and was hoping that with three old iPods I might be able to put together a centrally managed house-wide audio system." Ideally it would be possible to control what's playing from a central web interface using an app on an IOS or Android device. With the iPods already plugged into docking stations and on the home wifi network, I assume it should be possible. A search of the Apple app store didn't bring up much and forking out $AUS400 for a Sonos One or equivalent seems wasted when I've already purchased iPod docks. Can anyone recommend an App that will still be compatible with old (ie. 2007) iPods and might do this? Or is there a better cheap alternative? Leave your best answers in the comments. Can you convert old iPods into a home music-streaming solution?

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Categories: Geeky Stuff

Bill Gates Just Bought 25,000 Acres in the Arizona Desert

Slashdot - Sun, 12/11/2017 - 10:42
What's the world's second-richest man up to now? A Phoenix news station reports: One of Bill Gates' investment firms has spent $80 million to kickstart the development of a brand-new community in Arizona's far West Valley. The large plot of land is about 45 minutes west of downtown Phoenix off I-10 near Tonopah. The proposed community, made up of close to 25,000 acres of land, is called Belmont. According to Belmont Partners, a real estate investment group based in Arizona, the goal is to turn the land into its own "smart city." "Belmont will create a forward-thinking community with a communication and infrastructure spine that embraces cutting-edge technology, designed around high-speed digital networks, data centers, new manufacturing technologies and distribution models, autonomous vehicles and autonomous logistics hubs," Belmont Partners said in a news release. A former columnist for the Phoenix newspaper writes that "Unless Gates plans to turn the land into a preserve, he might want to know a few things that the locals didn't tell him..." First, Arizona doesn't have enough water to continue these kind of developments, no matter what the mouthpieces of the Real Estate Industrial Complex say... Second, climate change poses a clear and present danger to Arizona now. Summers are significantly hotter and lasting longer than a few decades ago. Massive wildfires are common, another new phenomenon. Whether Phoenix will even be inhabitable by mid-century is an open question. Already, it is a man-made environment totally dependent on electricity to power air conditioning and gasoline delivered by vulnerable pipelines. All of which make it questionable whether all the dreamed developments ever get built, much less last long. "To be fair, wealthy people who were clever in one area -- especially tech -- often think they know a lot about everything," the columnist concludes. "If this is the case here, he might want to study up."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Geeky Stuff

Revisiting Nintendo's novelty pop hit

Eurogamer - Sun, 12/11/2017 - 10:00

The name Simon Harris has meant many different things to many different people, since the musician and producer began his career as a club promoter in London in the early 1980s. In 1986 he co-founded the Music of Life label - home to material by Paul Oakenfold, Norman Cook Fatboy Slim and Afrika Bambaataa - and in 1988 released the Public Enemy-sampling hit single 'Bass (How Low Can You Go)' under his own name. Harris has remixed countless artists, from Prince to Elvis Presley, and produced several breakbeat collections.

But in October 1992, he was the mastermind behind a single - and an album - that briefly lit up kids' bedrooms around the UK. As the lynchpin of Ambassadors of Funk, alongside British rapper Einstein (real name Colin Case, aka MC Mario for the project in question), Harris released 'Supermarioland' via Music of Life sub-label Living Beat, a high-energy dance track based on the 8-bit melodies of Nintendo's 1989 monochromatic platformer for the Game Boy. Its Chessington World of Adventures-shot video, featuring a legitimately haunting Mario costume, received enough TV airplay to turn heads, and the song broke the domestic top ten, ultimately remaining on the chart for eight weeks.

It was successful enough to earn the song a place on 1992's stocking-filler-friendly Now That's What I Call Music! 23 compilation, on the same disc as East 17's 'House of Love' and The Shamen's see-what-you-did-there-lads ecstasy anthem of 'Ebeneezer Goode'. But it came from an artist who'd not truly appreciated video games' place in the contemporary entertainment landscape of the era.

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Categories: Video Games
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